OUR STORY
It all began one winter day in Chef Willi Zach's kitchen....
Raclette and Fondues

 

Fondue is a Swiss meal taken in an pot (caquelon) over a small burner (rechaud) by some men and women round a table . The word comes from the French word naming an operation fondre (make liquid by heat).

 

Long-stemmed forks are used to put bits of food into a warm and liquid sauce. The sauce is warmed by a wax or alcohol burner.

 

 

Cheese Fondue is a Swiss dish of melted cheese served in a communal pot (caquelon or fondue pot) over a portable stove (réchaud) heated with a candle or spirit lamp, and eaten by dipping bread into the cheese using long-stemmed forks.

 

Bourguignonne and Chinoise 

 

Chinois: thinly sliced beef, chicken, veal, seafood —think carpaccio— served raw, then cooked by each guest in an aromatic broth, and accompanied by a variety of different dipping sauces same you would use for a Bourguignonne

 

Fondue Chinoise uses a pot of heated liquid to cook. Thinly sliced beef, chicken, veal, seafood —think carpaccio— served raw, then cooked by each guest in an aromatic broth, and accompanied by a variety of different dipping sauces. At the end of the meal, the liquid from the pot is drunk as a thick soup.

 

Bourguignonne: a dish consisting of pieces of steak,  impaled on forks, cooked in oil at the table and dipped in sauces. 

 

Fondue Bourguignonne is named after Burgundy in France. Fondue Bourguignonne uses a pot of heated oil to cook. Bits of meat are put into the oil to quickly cook them. A number of sauces are made ready on the side. The earliest statements of this dish seem to have been made in the 1950s.

 

Chocolate Fondue was first made in the 1960s. Slices of fruit or cake are put in a pot of warm, liquid chocolate.

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Monte Blanc 52 Swiss Restaurant NYC